George Rohac
Until now, there was no way to know how many people were going to support me. People are already pledging [their] money at the beginning to support this project, so that’s giving me a big confidence boost. The fans are here taking the risk ahead of time. This project made me realize how big an influence Mega Man has had on people.

Keiji Inafune (Creator of Mega Man and Mighty No. 9) talked to us about Mighty No. 9, and how it’s success on Kickstarter has made him realize the influence of Mega Man. (via polygondotcom)

More creators controlling their work and how it gets expanded is amazing, I love seeing more and more of these stories and statements get made.

Though I may have a some large biases in regards to this. 

kickstarter:

Kickstarter is officially open to projects based in Canada! 

Hooray! Now Breadpig can help out even more Canadians!

kickstarter:

Kickstarter is officially open to projects based in Canada! 

Hooray! Now Breadpig can help out even more Canadians!

Crowdfunding and Skills

So as some of you may be aware I have been assisting with a few kickstarters lately.

There are certainly more on the way, and at this rate, if I lump in the kickstarters where I just helped people find printers, and advised them on split runs (but did nothing else) I’m swiftly nearing a cool 500,000$ in successful Kickstarter machinating. Not money I have gained, but just a total sum of money I have helped bring directly to creators. Often times when they spit and swore at me that I was being too ambitious about their fanbase or the consumers. 

That said what I’m doing is nothing I feel is special. I have trained myself in an operational method of people. It is a skill that anyone can develop. Just like anyone can draw or write, time and dedication is the effort you must make. 

I will gladly give pointers, explain the rules of the form, and point people in the right direction, but that doesn’t mean they’ll be successful on their own. Over the years I found people still wanted to do it their own way, and I felt I wasn’t in a place to tell them otherwise. I didn’t value my abilities. 

Once I started to talk with authority I found even those who were previously speaking with authority stopped to turn. The other thing I did is stopped trying to save everyone. 

When it comes to any skill, you have to value it, respect what you do and know your limitations and reach. If you don’t do that you can’t expect anyone else to acknowledge what you do. 

The other is more personal. I grew up on videogames, and I’ll go against the grain and did say they gave me some really horrible habits - I want everything to be completed, and I want to save everyone. That’s what I got growing up, time and time again, but it isn’t something that translates to reality. 

What this all whistfully translates to is - work with people who value their work, that are working to get better, and have something to say. 

…And if you’re one of those people already, keep at it. If I don’t have the bandwidth or we don’t get to work together you’ll find someone like me. I may be one of the first of my kind, but there are going to be a lot more of us… I’m just ahead of the curve.